Volume 5, Issue 1, January 2017, Page: 1-5
Analysis of the Poem A Clock Stopped—from the Perspective of Disengagement in Cognitive Grammar
Yanbo Guan, The College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Heilongjiang Bayi Agricultural University, Daqing, China
Lixia Jia, The College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Heilongjiang Bayi Agricultural University, Daqing, China
Yanyu Gao, The College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Heilongjiang Bayi Agricultural University, Daqing, China
Received: Dec. 7, 2016;       Accepted: Dec. 23, 2016;       Published: Jan. 24, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijll.20170501.11      View  2702      Downloads  83
Abstract
According to cognitive grammar, language is an integral part of cognition. Thus, as the linguistic expression of a poet’s spontaneous thoughts, poetry will naturally reflect the poet’s cognitive activity. Emily Dickinson, an original and preeminent poet in American literature, has left us priceless heritage in poetry. And death, as one of her favorite motifs, could definitely not be passed over if one wants to have a good command of Dickinson’s poems. The article attempts to analyze the conceptual metaphor in the poem A clock stopped— from the perspective of disengagement in Cognitive Grammar, and manages to reveal the theme of the poem during the process. Through the analysis, it can be safely concluded that the theories in Cognitive Grammar can forge a happy marriage with literature criticism.
Keywords
Cognitive Grammar, Disengagement, Categorization, Conceptual Metaphor, Death Motif
To cite this article
Yanbo Guan, Lixia Jia, Yanyu Gao, Analysis of the Poem A Clock Stopped—from the Perspective of Disengagement in Cognitive Grammar, International Journal of Language and Linguistics. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2017, pp. 1-5. doi: 10.11648/j.ijll.20170501.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Reference
[1]
Evans, Vyvyan. (2015) The Crucible of Language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
[2]
Farr, Judith & Carter, Louise. (2004) The Gardens of Emily Dickinson. Cambridge/ Massachusetts/London: Harvard University Press.
[3]
Fauconnier, Gilles, Turner Mark. (2002) The Way We Think: Conceptual Blending and the Mind’s Hidden Complexities. New York: Basic Books.
[4]
Johnson, Thomas H. The complete Poems of Emily Dickinson. Boston/Toronto: Little, Brown and Company.
[5]
Lakoff, G. and Johnson Mark. (1980) Metaphors We Live by. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
[6]
Langacker, R. W. (1990) Concept, Image, and Symbol: The Cognitive Basis of Grammar. Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
[7]
Langacker, R. W. (1999) Grammar and Conceptualization. Berlin/New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
[8]
Langacker, R. W. (2003) Extreme Subjectification: English Tense and Modals [A]. In Hubert Cuyckens (eds.). Motivation in Language. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company.
[9]
Langacker, R. W. (2008) Cognitive Grammar: A Basic Introduction. New York: Oxford University Press.
[10]
Langacker, R. W. (2016) Ten Lectures on Cognitive Grammar: Dimensions of Elaboration. Beijing: Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press.
[11]
Leiter Sharon. (2007) Critical Companion to Emily Dickinson. New York: An imprint of Infobase Publishing.
[12]
Martin, Wendy. (2007) The Cambridge Introduction to Emily Dickinson. New York: Cambridge University Press.
[13]
Pollack, Vivian R. (2004) A Historical Guide to Emily Dickinson. New York: Oxford University Press.
[14]
Porter, David. (1966) The Art of Emily Dickinson’s Early Poetry. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Browse journals by subject