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Volume 5, Issue 4, July 2017, Page: 88-94
Cultural Signification and Philosophy Embedded in Chinese Calligraphy: A Semiological Analysis
Chen-chun E, Department of Chinese Language and Literature, National United University, Miaoli City, Taiwan
Received: Mar. 26, 2017;       Accepted: Apr. 24, 2017;       Published: Jun. 22, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijll.20170504.11      View  2197      Downloads  176
Abstract
Chinese brush calligraphy has not only aesthetic value, but it is also fully loaded with semiological signification of Chinese qi philosophy. Adopting Roland Barthes’s theory on signs, this paper aims to discuss signification of qi in Chinese calligraphy. In addition, drawing on the Saussurean dichotomy of langue and parole as well as Barthes’s contention about signification and metalanguage, I argue that in the underlying langue of Chinese culture exists the philosophy of qi as a whole, whereas calligraphy is one of the genres for qi to be manifested and signified.
Keywords
Semiology, Roland Barthes, Signification, Chinese Calligraphy, Culture
To cite this article
Chen-chun E, Cultural Signification and Philosophy Embedded in Chinese Calligraphy: A Semiological Analysis, International Journal of Language and Linguistics. Vol. 5, No. 4, 2017, pp. 88-94. doi: 10.11648/j.ijll.20170504.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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