Volume 6, Issue 5, September 2018, Page: 154-162
Pragmatics Pattern of Translating Lingnam Culture-Loaded Words and Phrases—Taking English Periodicals of the First Half of 19th Century in China as an Example
Wang Hai, School of Interpreting and Translation Studies, Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, Guangzhou, China
Wang Haichao, Department of Anthropology and Sociology, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, London, the United Kingdom
Zhang Shuo, School of Interpreting and Translation Studies, Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, Guangzhou, China
Received: Jun. 26, 2018;       Accepted: Aug. 2, 2018;       Published: Oct. 12, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijll.20180605.13      View  331      Downloads  36
Abstract
In this essay, we attempt to explore the implication of the pragmatic patterns of Lingnam-culture-loaded words and phrases in the English periodicals translated mostly by protestant missionaries during the 19th century. With a keen interest in Cantonese and Lingnam cultures, foreign dwellers have launched English periodicals, aiming to familiarize their fellowmen with Lingnam’s local customs, and Chinese society in general. Such cultural distinctions embedded in numerous Lingnam-culture-loaded words and phrases have guided mission activities to conduct in local communities. We apply a deep analysis of the first hand missionary periodicals, and argue firstly, protestant missionaries translated Lingnam-culture-loaded words and phrases into English with model “Cantonese Transliteration + Liberal Translation (+ Paratext)”. Secondly, we find that while compiling English-Chinese dictionaries and publishing periodicals, protestant missionaries initially annotate a Cantonese entry by Roman alphabet, then translate it liberally, at times appending paratexts, which comment on cultural difference concerning the terms. In this view, the model of “Cantonese Transliteration + Liberal Translation (+ Paratext)” has been examined as one efficient way to promote Lingnam and Chinese culture into the West. One of methodological significance of this essay is it has systematically analysed the annotation methods prevailed in various foreign periodicals, for instance The Indo-Chinese Gleaner, The Canton Press, The Canton Miscellany, The Chinese Repository and so forth. Also the academic implication of this essay lies in the fact that it firstly has neatened the annotating system of Lingnam-culture-loaded words and phrases, and secondly, is a full endeavour to unpack how the annotation system has been generated and influenced on the transmission of Lingnam and Chinese culture.
Keywords
English Periodicals in China, Lingnam-Culture-Loaded Words and Phrases, Pragmatics Pattern
To cite this article
Wang Hai, Wang Haichao, Zhang Shuo, Pragmatics Pattern of Translating Lingnam Culture-Loaded Words and Phrases—Taking English Periodicals of the First Half of 19th Century in China as an Example, International Journal of Language and Linguistics. Vol. 6, No. 5, 2018, pp. 154-162. doi: 10.11648/j.ijll.20180605.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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